The disappearance of bees, A risk to humanity?

Javier Alvarez our Argentine correspondent originally wrote this article, which has been translated into English for our readers. Bees play a vital role in the development and survival of our planet and have done so for more than three hundred thousand years. 20,000 species of bees There are more than 20,000 species of bees, yet […]

By Max Stevens on August 14, 2019
The disappearance of bees, A risk to humanity? Image

Javier Alvarez our Argentine correspondent originally wrote this article, which has been translated into English for our readers.

Bees play a vital role in the development and survival of our planet and have done so for more than three hundred thousand years.

20,000 species of bees

There are more than 20,000 species of bees, yet and only some of them are used by beekeepers for the production of honey. An example of such breed is the Apis mellifera, better known as the domestic bee or European bee. These small insects of the Apidae family, called Hymenoptera, fulfil the vital function of pollinating the plant species, allowing them to develop their fruits and in turn the seeds. This practice is necessary for the propagation of the plant species.

For several years researchers have observed the diminishing number of bees. Whilst much has been said not enough has been done to curb the decline. Should this trend continue we could potentially threaten global food security even further.

The biggest decline in populations

It has been noted that the biggest decline in bee populations is occurring in Europe, North America and Latin America. These areas are powerhouses when it comes to supplying the world with staple crops, such as soya, maize and wheat.

75% of our crops need pol

The FAO observed that 75% of the crops that feed the global population required the pollination of insects. Should bee populations continue to diminish, crops such as coffee, cocoa, fruit and vegetables could be at risk. Ultimately leaving human beings vulnerable.

Unless you have been living under a rock, you will be familiar with climate change. And as a farmer, have likely experienced the effects first hand. Bees are not exempt from this powerful change, and in fact, researchers relate the diminishing population figures, to man-made pollution.

The rise in temperature year in and year out. Combined with the excessive use of agrochemicals, and constant reduction of buffer surfaces such as forests have put our pollinating companions at risk.

This is why it is vital for us to coexist with nature, and find the most sustainable methods to run our operations. Thus ensuring economic viability and reduced damage to the lands around us.

About the farmer: Max Stevens
Co-Founder of Gordios